Allergy Season: Allergies to Look Out For

The allergy season for people with allergies has marked its way in the country. While the flowers are blooming, your nose may probably be running, or your eyes are watering –this is not the only trouble Spring has to offer; there is a lot more in the store.

You may experience allergy of one kind or another during a year. But, have you observed that every year, the count of people affected by seasonal allergies is climbing? According to forecasts, 2019 may prove to be worse than usual for allergies. The ever-increasing numbers suggest that you have to be more careful with your health during this season.

When the Allergy Season Begins

Allergies may surface at any point of the year, but some allergens – pollens to be specific –are seasonal. When the plants reproduce, they generate a fine powder called pollen. Here is a brief on which pollen may block your nasal passage, or cause itching at what time.

  • Tree Pollens accompany the Spring season in late March.
  • Grass pollens pop up in late Spring around May.
  • Weed pollens arrive in Summers (July to August) and
  • Ragweed pollen hit the US in fall (late August)

Allergies to Be Aware Of

Allergic Rhinitis

Hay fever is a product of pollen allergies. Allergic rhinitis is the most common allergy to hit millions of Americans every year. A small pollen grain may cause you much trouble than you may anticipate –from minor itching to coughing, a sore throat to wheezing, or breathing difficulties.

You are likely to come in contact with pollens in the morning as it is the peak time for pollination. If you have oak, maple, ash, or birch tree in your locality in abundance, your chances of inhaling pollens are higher. It is better to stay indoors and avoid exposure to pollen trees and flowers.

A recent research study suggests that airborne pollen count is on the rise across the globe as a result of global warming, and it will only become worse.

If you are affected by hay fever use antihistamines, over-the-counter products are a good option, but you can always go back to nature. Use vitamin C, honey, or butterbur to counter your allergy. Rinse off your nasal passage to clear the mucus with saline water.

Asthma

Asthma and allergy triggers have already marked their appearance this season. Pollen is possibly the main culprit offending your springtime asthma. You may be sniffing, and sneezing, with a thought to stay indoors until the season ends. Pollen is not the only offender; the air quality, temperature change, and an already existing allergy may also worsen your allergic asthma. Under an asthma attack, your nose, ears, airways, lungs, throat, or sinuses gets affected.

Food Allergies

Certain foods may deplete your seasonal allergies.  Your morning coffee cup, a small chocolate bar, or a processed food item, all tend to stimulate your hay fever. If you are allergic to ragweed pollen, minus melons, cucumber, banana, and sunflower seeds from your diet. Consuming these fruits in large quantity may cause an allergic reaction to worsening your seasonal allergy.

Bottom Line

Allergies are always in the season – in different forms with different effects. The allergies are more or less the same, but your body may trigger a new allergen. Seeking medical help will allow you to fight all the new and old triggers.

Contact us and schedule an appointment with the best allergist in NYC Dr. Sneeze!

Boyan Hadjiev, MD
30 East 40th Street
Suite 1200
New York, NY 10016
212-319-5282

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